DCMA 14 point schedule check – High Duration

In our seventh article looking at the 14 point check we described how we at checked Negative Float, in this post we are going to take a look at High Duration.

The DCMA criteria states that the total number of activities that have a duration longer than 2 months (44 working days) should not exceed 5% of the total number of activities in the schedule.

High Duration Check

To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. In project view add the Total Activities column and make a note of this number.

Step 2. Create a new report using the Report Wizard, select Activities as it is activity data we require in the report. Add the Remaining Duration column as we are looking to find out how many activities have a duration of over 44 days.

Step 3. Create a filter to show only the activities with a Remaining Duration of over 44 days. Click through and type in the report name.

Step 4. Run the report ensuring to select ASCII and ensure that the Text Qualifier is set to “ so the output will be in Excel.

Step 5. Highlight the High Duration numbers and make a note of the count, divide this by the Total Activities number noted dow earlier.

If the percentage is 5% or less than the criteria has been met, if above the 5% then a schedule review may be required.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 point schedule check – Negative Float

In our sixth article looking at the 14 point check we described how we checked High Float, in this post we are going to take a look at Negative Float.

The DCMA criteria states that no activities that are incomplete should have a float total of less than 0 working days.

Negative Float Check To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. In the Project view add the Total Activities column and make a note of the Total Activities in the schedule.

Step 2. Create a new report using the Report Wizard, selecting Activities as it is activity data we require in the report. Add the Free Float column as we are looking to find out how many activities have a Negative Float value.

Step 3. Create a filter to show only the activities with a Float value of less than 0.

Step 4. Click through to type a report name, populate with the name then run the report. As we want the report in Excel select ASCII and ensure that the Text Qualifier is set to “. The report will open in Microsoft Excel, highlight the High Float numbers and make a note of the count.

Step 5. Divide the number of negative float activities by the total number of activities.

Any incomplete activities with float of less than 0 working days means the criteria has not been met and the schedule should be reviewed. The DCMA states a 0% threshold on negative float.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 point schedule check – High Float

In our fifth article looking at the 14 point check we described how we checked Hard Constraints, in this post we are going to take a look at High Float.

The DCMA criteria states that the total number of activities with float greater than 2 months (44 working days) should not exceed 5% of the total number of activities in the schedule.

High Float Check

To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1.  Add the Total Activities column in the Project view, make a note of the Total Activities in the schedule.

Step 2. Create a new report using the Report Wizard, select Activities as it is activity data we require in the report.

Step 3. Add the Free Float column as we are looking to find out how many activities have a float of over 44 days. Select Filter and create a filter to show only the activities with a High Float of over 44 days.

Step 4. Type in the report name and run the report. As we want the report in Excel select ASCII and ensure that the Text Qualifier is set to “.

Step 5. The report will open in Microsoft Excel, highlight the High Float numbers and make a note of the count. Divide the count of the High Float activities by the total number of activities.

If the percentage is 5% or lower than the criteria has been met, if higher than 5% then the schedule may require a review.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 point schedule check – Finish to Start Relationships

In our third article looking at the 14 point check we described how we at checked Lags, in this post we are going to take a look at Finish to Start relationships. The DCMA criteria states that the total number of activities with a Finish to Start relationship should make up 90% or greater of the total number of activities in the schedule. Non typical links should be limited to 10% of the schedule total number of activities.

Finish to Start Check To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. Open the project that is to be checked then we need to create a new report through the Report Wizard.

Step 2. As it is the relationships we are interested in here, select Activity Relationships in the Subject Area. We do not require any additional subject areas so click next.

Step 3. Click on Columns so we can select the appropriate data we wish to include in the report. In this case we are interested in the Relationship Type. Only include this in the Selected options column.

Step 4. As we want the report in Excel select ASCII and ensure that the Text Qualifier is set to “. Run the report.

Step 5. Delete the top two rows in the excel report produced and add a 1 next to each identified Relationship Type. Insert a pivot table to group the data into the relevant Relationship Types.

Step 6. Now divide the total the FS Relationship Type by the total for all Relationship Types.

If the percentage is 90% or higher than the criteria has been met, if not then a review of the schedule relationship types may need to take place.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 point schedule check – Lag

In article two looking at the 14 point check we described how we at checked Negative Lag, in this post we are going to take a look at Lag, to be honest the steps almost mirror those described in the previous post, nevertheless here we go.

Lag Check This check looks at the  Lag between activities. The criteria states that there should be no more than 5% of Negative Lag in a schedule. To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. Check the Project activity totals, which can be found in the Project View in the ‘Total Activities’ column. Make a note of this number.

Step 2. Create a report in Primavera P6 that filters out activities that have zero or negative lag, we just want the positive Lag values.

Step 3. Run the report making sure to save as an ASCII Text File, the report should open in Microsoft Excel.

Step 4. Highlight the positive Lag values which will give you a count, make a note of this number.

Step 5. Divide the count of activities by the total number of activities (the number from Step 1 and this will give you a %. If the percentage is 5% or lower, then the criteria has been met, if not then a review of the schedule lags may need to take place.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 Point Schedule Check – Negative Lag (Leads)

Article 2 of 14

Slightly earlier than promised.

In our first article looking at the 14 point check we described how we checked Logic, in this post we are going to take a look at Negative Lag, or Leads if you prefer. Again this approach was used for the same client as in the previous post.

Negative Lag Check

This check looks at the Negative Lag between activities.The criteria states that there should be 0% of Negative Lag in a schedule.

To check this in Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. Check the Project activity totals, which can be found in the Project View in the ‘Total Activities’ column. Make a note of this number.

Step 2. Create a report in Primavera P6 that filters out activities that have zero or positive lag, we just want the Negative Lag values.

Step 3. Run the report making sure to save as an ASCII Text File, the report should open in Microsoft Excel.

Step 4. Highlight the Negative Lag values which will give you a count, make a note of this number.

Step 5. Divide the count of activities by the total number of activities (the number from Step 1) and this will give you a %. If the percentage is 0% or lower, then the criteria has been met, if not then a review of the schedule lags may need to take place.

There are a further 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

DCMA 14 point schedule check – Logic

Article 1 of 14

This is the first article of a series of 14 planned to be run, each will be published on a Monday evening. On completion of the series a set of documents and video tutorials will also be published on myxacom.com.

Has anybody applied the DCMA (Defence Contract Management Agency) 14 point check to their schedules and if so what software did you use?

We were recently supporting a client who had a requirement to assess their contractor schedules for some level of accuracy. The DCMA 14 point check was chosen, yet we didn’t have any specific software to run the analysis.

We opted for developing reports to be run from Primavera P6 and saved them as .csv files, from here we could sort and filter to assess the schedule data against elements of the 14 point check.

Below is an example of just one of the reports that we developed and how we utilised the data to assess against the 14 point check criteria.

The example we will use here is the Logic check.

Logic Check

This check looks at the links between activities. The criteria states that the number of activities in the schedule missing a predecessor, sucessor or both should not exceed 5% of the total activities in the schedule.

To check this is Primavera P6 we used the following steps:

Step 1. Check the Project activity totals, which can be found in the Project View in the ‘Total Activities’ column. Make a note of this number.

Step 2. Create a report in Primavera P6 that filters out activities that have predecessors and/or sucessors.

Step 3. Run the report making sure to save as an ASCII Text File, the report should open in Microsoft Excel.

Step 4. Sort on Column A and then delete any row with an Activity ID as a description or any Activity ID’s with a description.

Step 5. Highlight the remaining Activity ID’s which will give you a count (number of activities left).

Step 6. Divide the remaining count of activities by the total number of activities (the number from Step 1) and this will give you a %.

If the percentage is 5% or lower then the logic is within tolerance, if not then a review of the schedule logic may need to take place.

There are a futher 13 checks prescribed by the DCMA which along with the Logic Check will be detailed out in further supporting documentation and video tutorials at http://www.myxacom.com where knowledge is no weight to carry.

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